• Fantasy creature facial prosthetic on exhibit.
  • Props student in front of long, pink table set
  • Actors on stage in front of rolling prop made from stack of mattresses
  • Props student preparing props for performance

BFA (Properties and Objects)

CRICOS CODE 083697G

NIDA’s Bachelor of Fine Arts (Properties and Objects) is an immersive practice- based course, focused on instructing and developing artist and makers to pursue careers across the arts and entertainment industries.

Upon graduating, students are equipped with the knowledge and skills to pursue a cluster of careers as artists and makers of properties, practical effects, models and bespoke objects, as well as roles managing these fields in the arts and entertainment industries, including theatre, opera, dance, film, television, exhibitions and events.

Applications for 2019 courses extended to 31 October.

Apply now

About the course

Through project-based learning, students are guided in the growth of their professional artistic persona and practice. In the early stage of this course, students are introduced to foundational ideation, development and making techniques, such as hand drawing, sculpting, metalwork, woodwork, leatherwork, mould-making and casting, pattern-making, scenic art, technical drawing, set-dressing, model-making and graphics software.

As they progress through the course, students explore material culture, props in contexts, and the production of artisanal objects. Areas of further examination include costume jewellery, architectural models, electronics, joinery, film studies, puppetry, computer-aided design and 3D modelling for visualisation and digital fabrication. Logistical and resource management skills are taught through processes of projects realisation in studios, workshops and collaborative productions.

During the last year, this course includes the development and realisation of a self-determined masterwork project, undertaking of supervisory roles within collaborative productions and a national or international industry placement.

Course talk interview with Marcelo Zavala-Baeza, Head of Properties and Objects

Course dates and times

Course duration and contact hours

Students are at NIDA from 9am to 6pm from Monday to Friday. During production terms students may also be required for rehearsals after hours and on weekends.

Additional time also needs to be allocated to library work, research, preparation for classes and private study. For this reason it is difficult for NIDA students to maintain regular part-time jobs. Studying at NIDA is a big commitment so students need to manage their time and resources carefully. 

All NIDA Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees are three-year full-time courses. All NIDA Master of Fine Arts courses, except for Cultural Leadership, are 15-month full-time courses. 

2018 course dates

SEMESTER 1

Welcome week- 5 February- 9 February

Term 1: 5 February- 13 April

Mid-Semester Break: 14 April– 29 April

Term 2: 30 April– 29 June

MID-YEAR BREAK: 30 June- 22 July

SEMESTER 2

Term 3: 23 July– 7 September

Mid-Semester Break: 8 September- 16 September

Term 4: 17 September– 15 November

The semester continues until early December for those involved in the Directors’ productions.

The scheduling and delivery of this course each year is subject to minimum enrolment numbers.

2019 course dates

SEMESTER 1

Term 1: 4 February- 14 April

Mid-Semester Break: 15 April– 28 April

Term 2: 29 April– 30 June

MID-YEAR BREAK: 1 July - 21 July

SEMESTER 2

Term 3: 22 July– 8 September

Mid-Semester Break: 9 September- 15 September

Term 4: 16 September– 17 November

The semester continues until early December for those involved in the Directors’ productions.

The scheduling and delivery of this course each year is subject to minimum enrolment numbers.

Subjects

First year

First year at a glance

In brief
  • Construction of properties
  • Drafting
  • Model making
  • Sculpture
  • Life drawing
  • Scenic art
Delivery mode
  • Classes and studio work
  • Participation in the NIDA Production Program

Properties and Objects Studio

SEMESTER ONE

POB7101A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS STUDIO (20 credit points)

This subject introduces students to the foundations for the discipline of Properties and Objects. Students become familiar with the essential language, materials, technologies and techniques employed in the realisation of properties and objects. This is achieved through an applied educational process in the exploration of a variety of materials, and the tools for their manipulation thereby developing an understanding of the performance characteristics associated with the use of these tools and materials. This subject focuses on familiarising students with techniques and materials used in woodwork, metalwork, polymers, scenic painting, sculpture and drawing amongst others. Processes for the research and realisation of objects are also introduced.

Students begin to explore the classification and integration of information through the utilisation of recording and representational techniques as tools for communicating and developing constructive solutions for the realisation of properties and objects.

SEMESTER TWO

POB7101B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS STUDIO (20 credit points)

This subject expands on and consolidates the knowledge and skills gained in the preceding semester, focusing on introducing students to constructive techniques and processes for the production of original and duplicate properties and objects. Techniques and materials used in leatherwork and theatrical fluids are explored, as well as the processes of pattern making, model making, leatherwork, as well as moulding and casting. Students are led through the development process for properties and objects, from conception to the final piece, assisted by technical drawings and models to nurture comprehension, analysis and application of their learned skills and investigate materials, processes and techniques utilised for the creation of objects around the world. They conceptualise and execute a coherent body of work in relation to the guiding principles established through their own research, then present their work for critique and review by their peers and tutors.

Properties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration

SEMESTER ONE

POB7102A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (15 credit points)

Through the course of this subject, students utilise the NIDA play production program to develop an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of participants from other disciplines in the practice of presenting theatrical performance, in particular, the realisation of properties.

Students assume the role of a property maker within a large interdisciplinary team, collaborating to realise and present a creative vision that emulates theatrical industry practice. They are guided and directed in this process of realisation by third year supervisors.

In order to demonstrate their developing knowledge, skills and understanding of collaborative practices students will compile and present a reflective journal to their peers and an interdisciplinary panel of assessors.

SEMESTER TWO

POB7102B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (15 credit points)

Students contribute to the NIDA play production program second semester productions. Students are introduced to and utilise new methodologies through which to critique their own work and that of their peers. They develop a set of functional performance criteria that is informed by the demands of interdisciplinary collaborators. Through utilising these criteria to examine a completed property or properties, students systematically reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of their practice to inform their development as effective property makers within interdisciplinary collaborations. 

Under the guidance of a properties supervisor students are assigned to a theatre production and fulfil the role of properties assistants, helping in the construction and acquisition of varied properties, attend production meeting and become crew members during show performances. 

Properties and Objects Professional Practice

SEMESTER ONE

POB7103A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (10 credit points)

Properties and Objects Professional Practice provides students with the knowledge and skills to establish and sustain a professional career as properties and object maker in the creative and performing arts industries, particularly with regard to the development of a sense of a personal professional identity, the communication tools and techniques required to convey this effectively.

In this first semester, students are introduced to communication, presentation, research and self-evaluation techniques, which will form the basis of their lifelong learning and development as professional properties and object makers. Basic concepts of applied practice such as financial management skills, sustainable practice and the fundamentals of Workplace Health and Safety are introduced.

SEMESTER TWO

POB7103B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (10 credit points)

Students are introduced to online presentation and presence, object evaluation frameworks and methodologies, project management tools and processes and peer-evaluation techniques, which will further inform their lifelong learning and development as a professional properties and objects maker.

Through a student-led investigation each student will explore an assigned area from the aforementioned topics, presenting and debating their findings via digital media, further extending their understanding of contemporary communications technology. This will develop and broaden their capabilities in the utilisation of professional communication processes.

Students will gain knowledge of methods and strategies through which to critique their own work and that of their peers, as well as tools for systematic reflection on the strengths and weaknesses of their practice, in order to inform their development as effective property and object makers, preparing for a future in the entertainment and arts industry.

Performance and Ideas

SEMESTER ONE - COM7101A PERFORMANCE AND IDEAS (10 credit points)

SEMESTER TWO - COM7101B PERFORMANCE AND IDEAS (10 credit points)

This subject gives students a theoretical, critical and experiential understanding of key contexts, forms and conventions based on a chronological framework that supports an understanding of the Western theatrical canon.

In understanding the historical and social context ranging from ancient Greeks to contemporary Australian film practices, students will interrogate key figures, forms, conventions, productions, plays and practices of each topic.

Fundamental to ‘Performance and Ideas’ is students’ ability to actively relate these various historic practices of the Western theatrical canon to their own performance-based disciplines as 21st century artists.

Introduction to Collaboration

SEMESTER ONE

COM7102A INTRODUCTION TO COLLABORATION (5 credit points)

The focus of Introduction to Collaboration is the theory and practice of collaboration.

This subject introduces students to the principles of collaboration, which includes defining collaboration and creativity and examining how ethics, values and behaviours of collaboration are generated. Students investigate notions of ownership, agreement, creative conflict and how to generate ideas and create innovative practice.

This subject provides a theoretical, conceptual and practical scaffold for other BFA subjects including Student-led Projects and Interdisciplinary Collaboration.

SEMESTER TWO

COM7102B INTRODUCTION TO COLLABORATION (5 credit points)

This subject builds upon the principles of collaboration, skills and conceptual tasks featured in the previous semester. The concepts previously explored are now realised through practice in a group collaborative project..

These small cross cohort collaborations are supervised and mentored. They have strategies and articulated milestones for the collaboration built into the conceptual plan so that students remain accountable to the learning outcomes of the subject.

Second year

Second year at a glance

In brief
  • Sculpting
  • Prosthetics
  • Model making
  • Structures and mechanics
  • Joinery
  • Puppetry
  • Computer-aided drafting (CAD)
Delivery mode
  • Classes
  • Studio work

Properties and Objects Studio

SEMESTER ONE

POB7201A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS STUDIO (30 credit points)

Students are guided in the application of methodological systems for the development of properties. This process ranges from conception, using stimulus images and knowledge, to realisation, assisted by plans and maquettes. They create and incorporate models for visualisation, anticipate constructive problems and make significant decisions to improve the expected outcomes, and become aware of the varied contexts and purposes in which models are utilised in the creative and performing arts industries. They generalise project development goals, considering time frames and material quantities, in order to specify milestones to achieve timely and sequential process outcomes.

In order to demonstrate their gained knowledge and skill progression, students develop, construct and showcase two major projects: a large sculptural piece and a short film. To instigate the sculptural project students will propose a theme to explore, construct a maquette of their proposed sculpture and accurately translate it into a full sized piece. For the short film, students will be stimulated and become familiar with film model making methods, analogue and digital manufacturing techniques, and filming and editing knowledge. Through the realisation of the short film model project students are introduced to the principles and role of objects for storytelling.

SEMESTER TWO

POB7201B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS STUDIO (30 credit points)

Through the first part of this subject students concentrate on their ability to replicate an existing object. The second part focuses on demonstrating the fundamental role of properties and objects in storytelling.

This subject involves the completion of two major projects: a replica of a furniture piece and performance of puppetry.

When realising their furniture replica students have to investigate the materials, tools and methods used in the construction of the original furniture piece; drawing on this research they experiment, sample and propose methods for the construction of a replica. For the puppet show, they are introduced to set dressing, mask making, prosthetics and puppetry, and for the short film they will become familiar with film model making methods, both analogue and digital manufacturing modelling techniques, along with photographic and editing knowledge as processes to be considered and integrated into the realisation of the resultant work.

Properties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration

SEMESTER ONE

POB7202A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (5 credit points)

Within this subject students will set expectations for effectively utilising communication to solve problems with interdisciplinary collaborators. This will then be practically implemented and tested against the complexities of realising properties and objects in a collaborative setting. Differences between expectation and actual process will inform an analysis of the effectiveness of the methodology.

Students explore one-to-one interdisciplinary communication on a practical project with a creative collaborator, developing personal methodologies for communication and collaboration in interdisciplinary settings. The evolution of these strategies is guided by firstly recording their initial expectations, goals and a proposed strategy for their realisation. Students record the results of the plan as implemented and any necessary deviations, before analysing the efficacy of the methodology when applied to the realistic complexities of realising properties and objects in a collaborative setting, at the conclusion of the project.

SEMESTER TWO

POB7202B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (5 credit points)

Students refine the personal methodology developed previously, by repositioning it within a formalised structure or process for effective communication and collaboration in interdisciplinary contexts. The efficacy of the strategy is evaluated in the context of identification and resolution of practical performance problems in a puppetry-based theatre project.

Students are required to use reflective tools to build a methodology for preparing for formalised communicative events, as well as evaluating the outcomes of these of these events, particularly the effectiveness of decisions that are arrived at as a result.

Properties and Objects Professional Practice

SEMESTER ONE

POB7203A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (10 credit points)

Students develop the effective utilisation of project management strategies and methodologies such as production research, budget, resource and work space management, scheduling and planning. Students also extend and deepen the detail of their knowledge of WH&S practice and process within the context of Properties and Objects workshops.

Students apply their knowledge by developing a planned budget and scheduled production timelines that are actively tracked throughout the realisation process, and reconciled at the completion of each unit in the major studio program. Through the ongoing analysis of the resultant knowledge Professional Practice students will anticipate and identify problems, particularly those pertaining to the resource constraints of the project(s) as they emerge, affording them greater control over the decision-making required for the resolution of these problems in a timely fashion

SEMESTER TWO

POB7203B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (10 credit points)

In this subject, students apply their knowledge by developing a budget and scheduled production timelines that are actively tracked throughout the realisation process. These are reconciled at the completion on an individual basis for a project that requires the fabrication, assembly and finishing of multiple components, utilising and co-coordinating multiple workspaces within the major studio program.

Students engage as a member of a co-operative team to realise properties, made up not only of multiple components requiring the utilisation of multiple workspaces, but also to support multiple productions with their respective demands and constraints. Through the ongoing analysis of the resultant knowledge, students anticipate and identify problems, particularly those pertaining to the resource constraints of the project(s). At the conclusion of each project students will be required to evaluate the process with specific consideration given to initial assumptions, contingences, process / problem driven variations and any discrepancies that arise once the project is reconciled. 

Performance and Ideas

SEMESTER ONE - COM7201A PERFORMANCE AND IDEAS (10 credit points)

SEMESTER TWO - COM7201B PERFORMANCE AND IDEAS (10 credit points)

This subject builds upon the knowledge and analytical skills built in the earlier semesters of Performance and Ideas.

This subject gives students a theoretical, critical and experiential understanding of key contexts, forms and conventions based on a contemporary chronological framework of the Western theatrical canon of the 20th and 21st centuries.

In understanding the historical and social context ranging from Brecht to contemporary gaming storytelling practices, students will interrogate key figures, forms, conventions, productions, plays and practices of each topic.

Fundamental to ‘Performance and Ideas’ is students’ ability to actively relate these various historic practices of the 20th century Western theatrical canon to their own performance based disciplines as 21st century artists.

Student-led Projects

SEMESTER ONE

COM7203A STUDENT-LED PROJECTS (5 credit points)

Student-led Projects derive from the theoretical and methodological frameworks explored in Introduction to Collaboration. Students self-select their collaborative teams with cross cohort representation. Together each team shapes an idea for presentation drawing on the individual knowledge and ability of each member to problem-solve in the development and realisation of the collaborative endeavour. Collaborative groups request input from staff or external mentors when it is required. In this subject, students apply their acquired knowledge of behaviours, innovation in practice, leadership, followership, emotional intelligence and negotiation skills to devise a collaborative performative work.

Each group draws on the collective knowledge of different performance forms and processes to decide on the particular shape of their work and has strategies and articulated stages for the collaboration built into a written conceptual plan. A peer-review framework for assessment makes each student individually and collectively behaviourally accountable to the vision of the work.

SEMESTER TWO

COM7203B STUDENT-LED PROJECTS (5 credit points)

In this subject students build on the collaborative practice project established in the preceding semester by bringing their project to realisation and, if they wish, presenting it in a public or semi-public setting.

Students complete their documentation of the whole project in this semester, refine and finalise their framework for

peer review, and document the outcome of the peer review process after final presentations of the work.

Third year

Third year at a glance

In brief
  • Working on NIDA productions
  • Undertaking an industry work placement
  • Completing a Properties Masterwork
Delivery mode
  • Studio work
  • NIDA production work
  • Industry placement

Properties and Objects Studio

SEMESTER ONE

POB7301A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS STUDIO (30 credit points)

Utilising the knowledge and creative thinking skills developed previously, students embark on large-scale self-guided projects to refine the skills and abilities as they approach completion of their course.

Students are required to produce a proposal for their Masterwork project outlining their motivations rationale and the conceptual framework that underpins the project. As well students compile a developmental research journal that includes all experiments, tests and findings to inform their material choices, construction techniques and processes to be used in the Masterwork fabrication.

Students also supervise the production of properties for the NIDA play production program.

SEMESTER TWO

POB7301B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS STUDIO (30 credit points)

During this subject students construct their Masterwork applying the knowledge and skills obtained during their educational / academic experience in NIDA. In order to prove the coherence of their abstract research through the resolution and expression of meaning, ideas and an artistic vision.

 As well, they are requested to produce an holistic archival document / research paper that synthesises and articulates all the relevant information, knowledge and processes developed and utilised in the realisation of their master work.

Students also demonstrate their capabilities, autonomously managing and supervising human and physical resources for the production of a live performance. 

Properties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration

SEMESTER ONE

POB7302A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (15 credit points)

Students will devise and co-ordinate a strategy for interdisciplinary communication that facilitates effective identification and resolution of problems encountered in the realisation of properties within a large team setting.

Students will identify an area of challenge or difficulty in this collaborative process that will form the stimulus for an investigation into strategies for resolving communicative and/or collaborative problems. Students will then select an alternative strategy and evaluate its efficacy in comparison to the course of action actually taken.

As properties supervisor within the NIDA play production program, students become actively involved in interdisciplinary meetings collaborating with all members of the creative team, including designers, costumiers and the director among others.

SEMESTER TWO

POB7302B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (15 credit points)

In this subject, students draw upon their prior learning in order to contextualise their personal prop making and creative practice within a broader interdisciplinary industry context. They devise and co-ordinate a strategy for interdisciplinary communication that facilitates effective identification and resolution of problems encountered in the realisation of properties within a collaborative environment.

As in the preceding semester, students are assigned to a NIDA play production as properties supervisor. They are involved in the contextualisation of the show earlier than previously, assisting to design presentations and contributing to planning meetings. 

Properties and Objects Professional Practice

SEMESTER ONE

POB7303A PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (10 credit points)

 Students formally construct a professional persona, drawing upon and classifying their knowledge, skills and attributes, with an understanding of their underlying motivations and emotional engagement with the practice of properties and object realisation. Students will be able to communicate a sense of professional self and the professional goals that are informed by this, within the arts and entertainment industry context.

By devising and proposing an area of heuristic study that they wish to engage with, setting its parameters, desired outcomes and areas of required research, students achieve metacognitive engagement with their own learning. This process will inform and guide the synthesis of knowledge and practice addressed across all subjects towards a unified professional practice. The resultant brief will be presented within a formally structured document layout that will enable review and reference by peers, examining their process of enquiry and realisation.

SEMESTER TWO

POB7303B PROPERTIES AND OBJECTS PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (20 credit points)

Students will undertake an Industry placement in which they will be required to reflect upon not only their own practice but that of professionals practicing within the industry, the relationships, and their points of parallels and difference to models developed at NIDA, with a view to how this may inform and guide their future development as realisers of properties and objects.

In addition, the investigation that students undertake to contextualise and inform their masterwork project will be documented within a formally structured academic paper, the contents of which will classify and organise the findings of this investigation such that it will examine its relative importance to their project(s) and its contribution to a coherent body of work.

The resultant findings and the realised object(s) from this project will be presented to a public audience of professionals, creative peers within the institution, as well as interested others. 

Admission criteria

Essential requirements for admission

Admission Criteria

NIDA's general entry requirements for accredited courses are:

  • Have completed a High School Certificate or equivalent qualification at the end of high school for undergraduate courses
    • NIDA will waive the requirement for completion of year 12 studies where an applicant's work and life experience supports their ability and skills to engage in their selected program (includes those who left secondary education more than 2 years ago).
  • Be 18 years of age by 31 March in the first year of enrolment for domestic students in undergraduate programs (only in exceptional circumstances can this condition be waived) and 18 years at date of commencement for international students (there is no waiver for international students on age).
  • Be proficient in written and spoken English. International students must have an English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 7.0 with no band score less than 6.0 (IELTS 8.0 for BFA (Acting)).
  • Have skills and knowledge appropriate to the level and discipline the applicant is seeking to gain admission into.
  • Have an evidenced interest in the performing arts.

NIDA does not currently have an enabled course or bridging program.

Essential requirements

We select students who:

  • demonstrate commitment, motivation and passion in relation to the arts, entertainment and related industries, to their chosen discipline, and to the course of study
  • provide evidence of their capacity to work creatively and imaginatively
  • demonstrate an aptitude to collaborate with peers as part of a creative process
  • demonstrate a range of knowledge, skills, technical abilities and/or problem-solving techniques relevant to their discipline
  • demonstrate cultural and contextual awareness
  • articulate and communicate ideas clearly

NIDA encourages applications from students from diverse backgrounds, with different levels of experience in theatre, film, television or other areas.

NIDA welcomes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants. General admissions requirements apply.

Due to the volume of auditions carried out, we are unable to provide you with individual feedback. The decision of the audition panel is final.

It is not possible to defer an offer of a place at NIDA.

International students

We require all international applicants to:

  • attend an audition in Australia.
  • be aware of the visa conditions and financial obligations you are required to meet as an overseas student.
  • accept full responsibility for all arrangements concerning entry into, and residence in, Australia (including visas and health insurance).
  • have an English language proficiency equivalent to an overall band score of 7.0 IELTS (8.0 for Acting). Information on IELTS and testing centres in your country is available at www.ielts.org This requirement may be waived for applicants that have completed their high school studies in English.

For more information on applying as an international student, see international students.

Domestic applicants with overseas qualifications

Domestic students with overseas qualifications must supply certified translations of their qualifications.

NIDA's general entry requirements apply and selection is based on merit.

Fees

Tuition fees

Domestic and international students are required to pay tuition fees by the due date each semester.

The tuition fees are reviewed each year and if you enrol you are liable for the additional tuition costs if the tuition fees rise during the course of your enrolments.

Domestic Students

Domestic students are Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents and New Zealand citizens.

Download the NIDA Domestic Undergraduate Student Fees Schedule 2018 (PDF 597KB).

Download the NIDA Domestic Undergraduate Student Fees Schedule 2019 (PDF 1115KB).

International Students

Fees and financial assistance vary for international students see International Students for full details.

Tuition fees overview

DegreeCourse duration2018 Annual tuition fee $AUD*Estimated total course tuition fee*
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Properties and Objects)Three years$14,277.96$42,833.88

Tuition fee details

Year 1, 2018
Subject codeSubjectCredit pointsEFTSL**Tuition fee*
Semester 1, 2018    
POB7101AProperties and Objects Performance Studio200.167$2,379.66
POB7102AProperties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration150.125$1,784.75
POB7103AProperties and Objects Professional Practice100.083$1,189.83
COM7101APerformance and Ideas100.083$1,189.83
COM7102AIntroduction to Collaboration50.042$594.92
Total for Semester 1, 2018 600.5$7,138.98
Semester 2, 2018    
POB7101BProperties and Objects Performance Studio200.167$2,379.66
POB7102BProperties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration150.125$1,784.75
POB7103BProperties and Objects Professional Practice100.083$1,189.83
COM7101BPerformance and Ideas100.083$1,189.83
COM7102BIntroduction to Collaboration50.042$594.92
Total for Semester 2, 2018 600.5$7,138.98
Total for Year 1 1201.0$14,277.96
Year 2, 2018
Subject codeSubjectCredit pointsEFTSL**Tuition fee*
Semester 1, 2018    
POB7201AProperties and Objects Performance Studio300.25$3,569.49
POB7202AProperties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration50.042$594.92
POB7203AProperties and Objects Professional Practice100.083$1,189.83
COM7201APerformance and Ideas100.083$1,189.83
COM7203AStudent-led Projects50.042$594.92
Total for Semester 1, 2018 600.5$7,138.98
Semester 2, 2018    
POB7201BProperties and Objects Performance Studio300.25$3,569.49
POB7202BProperties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration50.042$594.92
POB7203BProperties and Objects Professional Practice100.083$1,189.83
COM7201BPerformance and Ideas100.083$1,189.83
COM7203BStudent-led Projects50.042$594.92
Total for Semester 2, 2018 600.5$7,138.98
Total for Year 2 1201.0$14,277.96
Year 3, 2018
Subject codeSubjectCredit pointsEFTSL**Tuition fee*
Semester 1, 2018    
POB7301AProperties and Objects Performance Studio300.25$3,569.49
POB7302AProperties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration150.125$1,784.75
POB7303AProperties and Professional Practice150.125$1,784.75
Total for Semester 1, 2018 600.5$7,138.98
Semester 2, 2018    
POB7301BProperties and Objects Performance Studio300.25$3,569.49
POB7302BProperties and Objects Interdisciplinary Collaboration150.125$1,784.75
POB7303BProperties and Professional Practice150.125$1,784.75
Total for Semester 2, 2018 600.5$7,138.98
Total for Year 3 1201.0$14,277.96

*The tuition fees are reviewed each year and you are liable for the additional tuition costs if the tuition fees rise during the course of your enrolment.

** EFTSL - Effective Fulltime Study Load: indicates the relative study load of a subject against a full time study load of 1.0 for an academic year.

Administration fees

Administration and Other Fees 2019

These fees are payable at the time the service is provided or item purchased.

Item/ServiceDetail2019 Cost
Binding supplies1 comb,1 cover, 1 back$2
GraduationAcademic Dress Hire: gown, hood and cap$35
Additional tickets for guests (2 guests no charge)$20 per head
Student ID Card replacementReplacement of a lost student card$25
PhotocopyingB/W – single sided$0.05
B/W – double sided$0.10
Colour – single sided$0.10
Colour – double sided$0.20
Locker keyDeposit$25
Replacement of lost locker key$25
Testamur replacement1 testamur – domestic postage$80
1 testamur – standard international postage$90
Transcript replacement1 transcript – domestic postage$20
1 transcript – standard international postage$30

Additional costs

Equipment List

All items are to be labelled with your name prior to their arrival at NIDA.

This equipment will be checked by your Head of Department by 30 March 2018. You should consider your purchases as life-long investments. Please do not purchase these tools if you have any doubts about which items to select, all tools on this list will be discussed in the first weeks of study, such that any queries can be addressed at that time.

Compulsory WH&S equipment and tools

  • Respirator mask + filter (e.g. 3M Tekk half face respirator from Bunnings, or similar)
  • 1 pair heavy duty chemical resistant rubber gloves
  • 1 pair leather welding gloves
  • 1 pair general purpose leather work gloves
  • 1 pair of ear muffs or a supply of ear plugs
  • 1 pair of safety spectacles
  • Claw hammer 20oz. max.
  • Cordless drill + Phillips head No. 2 screwdriver bits
  • Set of H.S.S. drill bits 1.5mm – 6mm
  • Hot glue gun to accept glue sticks of 12mm diameter
  • Scale ruler, must have 1:25 scale
  • 8 metre metric tape measure
  • Scissors – general purpose
  • 1 pair insulated combination pliers
  • 1 pair long nose pliers
  • 1 Olfa (L-1) knife or NT cutter (L- 450,500,550) + spare 18mm blades
  • Adjustable spanner – approx. 200mm length
  • USB flash drive, to back up your personal files
  • Combination square
  • 300mm double edged metric steel rule
  • 6 x 150 slotted screwdriver
  • No.2 point Phillips screwdriver

In addition the following equipment will be necessary during the course; however it is not compulsory to have all the equipment immediately. It is possible to buy on an as needs basis.

Art Equipment

  • Clay modelling tools
  • Pencils (HB, 2B and 2H drafting)

Drafting and Model Making

  • Adjustable set square, Angle-Line Cat. No. 016030 or similar - no smaller (optional)
  • Pencils, H, 2H, HB and /or Clutch/ Mechanical pencils 2H, H, HB, 0.5mm lead
  • Quality polymer eraser

If you already own drafting pens or wish to use ink, then bring this equipment to the classes. Some of the equipment is expensive and fragile, take care of it and it will last many years.

Required Clothing

Shortly after arriving at NIDA you will be required to have a set of black clothes (i.e. long sleeved black top, long black trousers and black shoes) for production work.

You should also have protective footwear (fully closed leather shoes) such as rubber-soled Blundstones. It is compulsory that you purchase these for the beginning of term for usage in all workshop areas and/or theatre spaces.

Safe working clothing is COMPULSORY when in the workshop area. Closed shoes with leather uppers must be worn at ALL times in the workshop studios and theatres.

Recommended Reading

While students are provided with the script of any plays they are involved in as part of the NIDA Production Program, students are encouraged to purchase other scripts and textbooks for subjects such as Performance and Ideas.

Information Technology Recommendations

To access NIDA wireless (iWIRE) network, students are required to have access to a Laptop (Windows 7 and later), Macbook (Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard or later) or a Tablet (less than three years old with wireless facility). All the devices should comply with 802.11a/b/g/n WPA-Enterprise security. All notebooks should be secured with a Kensington lock to help prevent theft.

For file transfers and data backup, a 500GB hard drive or higher and an 8GB USB stick are also recommended, as is a DVD burner, for optimum visual graphics on your computer (Laptop/MacBook/Desktop etc.) a 1GB dedicated graphics card is recommended but not required.

Further financial information

Australian citizens and holders of permanent humanitarian visas are eligible for an Australian Government FEE-HELP loan for all or part of their tuition fees. For more information about FEE-HELP please read the information below and visit Study Assist.

FEE-HELP

WHAT IS FEE-HELP?

FEE-HELP is the Australian Government loan scheme that assists eligible students to pay their tuition fees, so that students do not have to pay tuition fees up-front. FEE-HELP can cover all or part of a student's tuition fees. In 2018 the FEE-HELP lifetime limit is $102,392.

A loan fee of 25% applies to FEE-HELP loans for undergraduate courses of study. The FEE-HELP limit does not include the loan fee.

The Government pays the amount of the loan directly to NIDA. Students repay their loan through the tax system once their income rises above the minimum threshold for compulsory repayment.

For more information go to www.studyassist.gov.au

WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR FEE-HELP?

You are eligible for a FEE-HELP loan if you are either:

  • an Australian Citizen; or
  • hold a permanent humanitarian visa.

The following students are NOT eligible for FEE-HELP:

  • New Zealand citizens - refer to the Study Assist website
  • Australian permanent residents
  • Overseas students.

Financial assistance

Eligible students, who are Australian residents, can apply to Centrelink for financial assistance through Youth Allowance, Austudy or ABSTUDY. Visit Centrelink or call 132 490 for more information.

While at NIDA, students can also apply for consideration for a NIDA student bursary. Each year there are a limited number of NIDA student bursaries to assist with living costs. These are allocated to students on the basis of financial need with second and third year undergraduates and Master of Fine Arts students prioritised. The bursaries are made available through the generosity of donors to NIDA and from bequests.

Statement of Tuition Assurance Exemption

Under the Higher Education Support Act 2003, (the HESA) and the Higher Education Provider Guidelines, approved Higher Education Providers must have arrangements in place to protect students if the Provider is unable to continue to offer a course for any reason, unless the Provider has been exempted from this requirement.

As required under 2.5.1.5 of the Higher Education Provider Guidelines of 23 November 2006, NIDA advises that, under section 16-30 (2) of the HESA, NIDA has been granted an exemption from the tuition assurance requirements of HESA. The reason for the exemption is that NIDA is in receipt of funding from the Australian Government. As NIDA is principally funded by the Australian Government, appropriate transition arrangements would be put in place should it be decided to discontinue a course.

FAQs

Entry requirements FAQs

What ATAR score do I need to get into NIDA?

Entry into NIDA courses is by audition or interview only. We do not ask for exam scores or ATAR rankings. However, all applicants applying for any higher education course at NIDA must have completed their Higher School Certificate or equivalent qualification at the end of high school. In exceptional circumstances this requirement can be waived. 

What subjects should I study at school?

NIDA does not require students to have studied any particular subjects at school. However, it is beneficial during their period of study at NIDA for students to have a high level of literacy and to have read widely. A strong working knowledge of subjects such as English and History is helpful to provide an understanding of historical context and literary references in theatre and literature. It is helpful to have an understanding of drama and, if possible, to have attended a range of theatre and films. Applicants for some courses often study Design and Technology, Textiles and Design, or similar subjects such as Art. Knowledge of a language other than English and understanding of other cultures is also beneficial. 

For courses such as Properties and Objects, Staging, Design for Performance, and Technical Theatre and Stage Management there is a need to have some numeracy and basic computing skills. For the Staging and Properties and Objects courses there is a need to be comfortable with basic applied algebra, geometry and physical concepts but memorisation is not required and use of these concepts is very practically focused. 

Is there a minimum age restriction?

The minimum age for entry into NIDA’s full-time courses is 18 years. Students are expected to be at least 18 years of age at the commencement of their first year, or within a few months of commencement. In exceptional circumstances this condition may be waived. Applicants must be at least 17 years of age at the time of their audition or interview.

Applications from those 16 years and younger will not be accepted.

Is there a maximum age restriction?

There is no maximum age restriction. As a guide to the age distribution at NIDA, the ages of students in undergraduate courses at the start of 2016 ranged from 17 years to early 30s, with the average age being 21.

The average age in the Master of Fine Arts courses is 32, with an age range from early 20s to mid-40s.

Application FAQs

How do I apply for a full-time course at NIDA?

Application to NIDA is by direct entry. Applicants apply online via the NIDA website.

NIDA will accept applications for the 2019 intake from 2 July - 30 September, 2018.

You must then prepare for your audition or interview, the details of which can be found on the course pages.

My application form isn’t working/loading!

If you are having difficulty using the online application form, check your internet browser: Chrome, Firefox and Safari are the recommended browsers. You should also turn off any security that blocks pop-ups, as this may prevent the application screen from opening. While application form will still work on a tablet or mobile device, it performs best on a PC or laptop.

Can I apply for more than one course?

Yes, however a separate online application form and payment of application fee AUD$75.00 will be required for each course you would like to apply for.

What do I do if the audition/ interview dates are not suitable?

NIDA aims to accommodate all Australian states during the audition/ interview period.

If the dates provided are not suitable to individuals applying to non-Acting courses we will try to work with you to create a mutually agreeable alternative. If you cannot attend any of the available dates, please select ‘Other Interstate’ when completing the application form and email applications@nida.edu.au to discuss further options.

Unfortunately due to the large volume of applications to the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Acting) course, we cannot schedule any alternative dates other than those advertised.

Audition and interview FAQs

What do I need to prepare for my audition/interview?

All the details for audition and interview requirements can be found on the individual course pages under the ‘How to Apply’ tab.

Does NIDA give audition/interview feedback?

Due to the large number of people being auditioned or interviewed, it is not possible for NIDA to provide individual feedback, either orally or in writing. However, the auditions and interviews are learning experiences, particularly through the opportunity in the auditions to observe the presentation of audition pieces by other applicants and any redirection suggestions provided to you or other applicants by members of the audition panel. 

What are my chances of getting into NIDA’s Acting course straight from high school?

There are around 1700 applicants for the 24 places in the Acting course. Most school leavers who apply for the Acting course are not accepted the first time they apply. There are advantages to having some life experience and maturity to be able to cope with a very rigorous course. However, the audition process is a valuable one and provides useful experience for future applications. There were two school-leavers among the 24 applicants selected for entry in 2016.

Where will my interview take place?

During your online application you will have the opportunity to select the date and location of your audition/ interview. The specific location details will be included in your receipt once you have submitted a complete application form. Please note that NIDA reserves the right to amend your audition/ interview date/ location at any time depending on scheduling requirements.

What happens after my interview?

Final selections are made for each course by mid- December when study offers will be distributed to successful applicants via email.

Please note applicants who do not make it through to the recall stage for Bachelor of Fine Arts (Acting) and Master of Fine Arts (Directing) courses have not been successful for the 2019 intake.

Studying at NIDA FAQs

What are the contact hours for BFA courses?

Students are at NIDA from 9am to 6pm from Monday to Friday. During production terms students may also be required for rehearsals after hours and on weekends.

Additional time also needs to be allocated to library work, research, preparation for classes and private study. For this reason it is difficult for NIDA students to maintain regular part-time jobs. Studying at NIDA is a big commitment so students need to manage their time and resources carefully.

How are NIDA’s courses structured?

NIDA offers a conservatoire based method of education and training based around intensive practice-based learning.

There is formal class work, practical instruction, lectures and, for some courses, periods of placements in the arts industry. Each course has dedicated time to discipline-specific immersion, as well as common subjects undertaken by students of all disciplines.

NIDA Play Productions and screen work provides practical learning experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply learnt technical skills. Play productions are an important part of NIDA’s higher education courses with usually five productions being produced each semester.

More detailed information about course structure can be found on the individual course pages. 

What facilities does NIDA offer?

NIDA’s award winning campus includes a range of facilities available to students:

  • the Parade Theatre, seating over 700 people, is equipped with advanced technology in sound, lighting and scenery
  • performance spaces of varying sizes. The Parade Studio, Parade Playhouse, Parade Space and Atrium are also utilised for productions
  • the state-of-the-art Reg Grundy Studio is used for film and television recording
  • the Rodney Seaborn Library, specialising in the performing arts
  • computer-aided design (CAD) and multimedia studios
  • rehearsal rooms, teaching spaces and music practice rooms
  • and workshops for the manufacture of scenery, properties and costumes.

What student services does NIDA offer?

Because of NIDA’s close relationship with UNSW, in addition to the NIDA library, NIDA students have access to the UNSW Library, The Learning Centre, health services and the UNSW Fitness and Aquatic Centre, all located close to NIDA.

NIDA students have access to student counselling services provided through UNSW.

Indigenous students can also use the services of the Nura Gili Indigenous Programs Centre at UNSW.

Does NIDA offer credit transfer for study undertaken elsewhere?

Yes, NIDA grants credit for formal study undertaken in recognised higher institutions in Australia, including universities, colleges, TAFE and other post-secondary education institutions and for study at recognised overseas institutions, where the applicant has met the learning outcomes, attained the knowledge and/or developed the skills relevant to a specific subject. An application for credit must be submitted and approved prior to commencement of the course. For further information see NIDA’s credit transfer policy.

Accommodation FAQs

NIDA does not provide accommodation for students. However the following information will help you consider some options available to you.

UNSW on-campus housing

Although NIDA is not part of the University of New South Wales (UNSW), NIDA students can access the student accommodation at UNSW.

UNSW is located directly across from NIDA on Anzac Parade, Kensington and has a number of on-campus residential colleges and self-catered apartments that Study Abroad students can apply for by going directly to their websites:

Fully catered colleges:

Self-catered apartments:

Seeking rental accommodation independently

Rental accommodation in the immediate vicinity of NIDA is not usually easy to find at short notice, can be expensive and Sydney landlords usually require a minimum six month lease to be signed. It is also in high demand so it is advisable to start searching at least two or three weeks before you start the course. You should also consider that not all accommodation is furnished and you may need to buy furniture.

Students tend to look for accommodation in suburbs near NIDA such as Randwick, Kensington, Kingsford, Coogee and Maroubra or, slightly further away, in Newtown, Surry Hills or Paddington, because of proximity and transport services. Students at NIDA often have to stay late during production and projects times so it is important that transport is available. Some useful websites that list rental agents and/or rental accommodation are:

Seeking share housing

Many students at NIDA find share accommodation in houses and apartments in the surrounding areas. The advantage to share renting is that all costs, rent, electricity, gas etc are shared, reducing the overall cost of living. Share rentals are often advertised on the rental websites given above, but NIDA students also post notices to the student web pages when they are seeking someone to share their accommodation. Students will be able to access these pages as soon as they have accepted their offer of place at NIDA.

Alternatively, there are local, public forums for seeking share-housing independently such as flatmates.com.au and closed Facebook groups such as Eastern Suburbs Housemates and Inner West Housemates (read the guidelines listed and request to join).

For any queries regarding the NIDA Study Abroad program contact us at applications@nida.edu.au.

NIDA Student policies FAQs

Can I defer my studies at NIDA?

Due to the highly competitive nature of NIDA’s admissions process, you must enrol for the year for which you have been offered a place. You cannot defer acceptance of a place. If you want to enrol in a subsequent year, you will need to apply again the following year and go through the audition/interview process again. There is no guarantee that you will be offered a place next time.

A first year student who discontinues a course of study during the year and wishes to return the following year, must re-apply for admission to NIDA in the normal manner. There is no guarantee of re-admission.

Application for leave of absence by continuing students must be made in writing with reasons to the Head of Course for consideration and recommendation to the Director. Approval for leave of absence can only be granted by the Director/CEO. It should be noted that approval for leave of absence will only be granted under exceptional circumstances.

Can students be suspended from NIDA?

In addition to cancellation of enrolment for non-payment of tuition fees, a student’s enrolment at NIDA can be suspended or cancelled on the grounds of misconduct. Refer to the Student Misconduct Procedures below.

Where can I find more information about NIDA Student Policies?

See NIDA Student Policies for more information. 

Fees FAQs

What are the tuition fees for accredited courses?

Full information about tuition fees and FEE-HELP is available under the ‘Fees’ tab on individual course pages. 

Are there any other costs to study at NIDA apart from tuition fees?

There is an optional annual fee of $40 to join the Student Council of NIDA (SCON).While students are provided with the script of any plays they are involved in as part of the NIDA Production Program, students are encouraged to purchase other scripts and textbooks for subjects such as Performance and Ideas.

Acting students must wear “blacks” to class everyday i.e. leotards, jogging pants, sweat pants, simple black tops or T-shirts, so students need to make sure they have at least a couple of sets of blacks to get themselves through the week. Acting students must also supply their own make-up and soft black shoes.

Scenic Construction and Technologies, Design for Performance, Costume, Properties and Objects, Technical Theatre and Stage Management students are required to purchase specific tools and equipment, which should be considered as lifelong investments. Students using workshop spaces are also required to have closed-toe protective footwear. Technical Theatre and Stage Management students should also have a few sets of “blacks” for working on productions.

Design for Performance students are also expected to purchase their own art equipment, drawing paper, cardboard and other material for models and should allow around $1000 for this each year.

To access NIDA wireless (iWIRE) network, students are required to have access to a Laptop (Windows 7 and later), Macbook (Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard or later) or a Tablet (less than three years old with wireless facility). All the devices should comply with 802.11a/b/g/n WPA-Enterprise security.

For file transfers and data backup, a 500GB hard drive or higher and an 8GB USB stick are also recommended, as is a DVD burner, for optimum visual graphics on your computer(Laptop/MacBook/Desktop etc..) a 1GB dedicated graphics card is recommended but not compulsory.

For a full list of additional costs by course please refer to the NIDA Domestic Undergraduate Student Fees Schedule 2019 (PDF 1115KB).

Financial assistance FAQs

Are there scholarships available for studying at NIDA?

NIDA does not offer scholarships that cover the cost of tuition fees. NIDA students, who are Australian citizens, are able to access FEE-HELP loans for assistance with their tuition fees. For more information on FEE-HELP loans see www.studyassist.gov.au.

NIDA offers students the opportunity to apply for financial assistance (bursaries) at the beginning of each year to assist with living costs. The bursaries are made available through the generosity of donors to NIDA and from bequests. Bursaries are paid on a fortnightly basis during the NIDA year, with the value of individual bursaries in 2014 ranging from $1500 annually to $4000 annually, depending on need and the year and course of study. These funds are allocated to students on the basis of financial need, course of study and year of study. Bursaries are only available to students currently enrolled at NIDA.

What other financial assistance is available to undergraduate students?

Eligible students enrolled in NIDA’s undergraduate courses can apply to Centrelink for Austudy, Youth Allowance and ABSTUDY. Visit Centrelink or call 132 490 for more information. 

Is financial assistance available for students in the Master of Fine Arts?

The Master of Fine Arts courses are not approved courses for students to receive Austudy, Youth Allowance (student) and Pensioner Education Supplement through Centrelink. Master of Fine Arts students are eligible to apply for a NIDA bursary

NZ and international students FAQs

Is there a limit on the number of international students accepted each year?

NIDA welcomes applications from international students. While there is no quota for international students, there are limited numbers of students in each course.

What are the English language requirements for international students?

Students must be proficient in written and spoken English, with international applicants required to have an English language proficiency equivalent to an overall band score of IELTS 8.0 for Acting, Directing and Writing for Performance, or IELTS 7.0 for other higher education courses. Information on IELTS and testing centres in your country is available at www.ielts.org.

International applicants who are short-listed for the Acting course after the recall audition must provide evidence of their English language capability by the end of the first week in December in order to be considered in the final selection process. International applications for other courses should bring evidence of their English language capability to their interview.

Where can I find more information about international students at NIDA?

More information about studying as an international student at NIDA can be found at International students

How to apply

Applications for 2019 courses extended to 31 October.

Apply now

Application Process

Application to NIDA is by direct entry. Applicants apply online via the NIDA website.

NIDA will accept applications for the 2019 intake from 2 July - 31 October, 2018. Interviews will be held in November.

Entry to the BFA Properties and Objects is by interview. Applicants will need to prepare a project prior to their interview - see below for details or download the BFA Application Guide for 2019.

How to apply

There are six steps to successfully applying for a NIDA course:

STEP 1

Create your application account (link to be provided from 2 July).

You will then be sent an automatic email with your log in details to continue your application.

STEP 2

Log in, select the green ‘New Application’ button and complete the online form.

STEP 3

Upload the following documentation to the online form:

  • Evidence of your most recent qualification (e.g. school report, Higher School Certificate, university transcript or testamur).
  • Proof of identification (e.g. passport, driver’s licence, birth certificate; ID must show your date of birth).
  • A passport style photograph (less than six months old, in colour, well lit, plain background).
  • Academic IELTS or equivalent (international applicants only)
  • Any course related documents/portfolios.

STEP 4

Make payment of the AUD$75 administration fee by credit/debit card.

STEP 5

Book your audition or interview date in your nearest capital city.

STEP 6

Attend your audition or interview, having prepared the relevant material for your course.

Interview dates

Below are the expected interview dates for 2018. Please note: NIDA reserves the right to amend and otherwise alter interview dates and locations, subject to minimum applicant numbers per region.

Brisbane

  • Wednesday, 28 November 2018

Melbourne

  • Wednesday, 21 November 2018

Sydney

  • w/c 12 November 2018
  • w/c 19 November 2018

For all other locations select ‘Other Interstate' when completing the application form and email applications@nida.edu.au to discuss your options.

Your Interview

What to prepare

SUBMIT WITH YOUR APPLICATION

The following may be uploaded with your application:

1. PORTFOLIO

  • You may upload a digital portfolio with your application; otherwise you can bring one with you to your interview. If you upload a digital version, please also bring along a display or printed copy to your interview. You should prepare examples of past work that you feel will support your application and demonstrate your suitability for a career in the arts and entertainment industry. These may include (but are not limited to) photos, life drawings, renders, illustrations, technical drawings, models, sculptures, and paintings. The purpose of the portfolio if to provide an insight into how you think as an artist.
PREPARE FOR YOUR INTERVIEW

The following should be prepared in advance to be discussed at your interview:

2. QUESTIONNAIRE

3. THEATRICAL PROP PROJECT

  • Prepare your project according to the requirements and bring it along to your interview for discussion.

What to expect on the day

If interviewing in Sydney, you should be prepared to spend half the day at your interview (i.e. either the morning or the afternoon). Interstate interviews will be scheduled on the hour.

The interview is in three parts:

  • First, there will be a brief talk about NIDA, the Properties and Objects course and what will happen during the interview. There will be an opportunity for you to ask any questions you may have about NIDA or about the interview itself.
  • Each applicant will then be interviewed for around 45 minutes. During the interview, we will discuss your project; your ideas about theatre, film and the broader creative industry; and why you want to study Properties and Objects at NIDA.
  • You will also undertake a short making task following a set of instructions. NIDA will provide all the equipment you will need for this.

Interview tips

Preparation! The more time and effort you put into the project and interview preparation in advance, the more confident you’ll be and the more you will benefit from the interview and discussion.

Come with a clear idea of why you want to study Properties and Objects at NIDA.

Plan your journey to the interview. Give yourself plenty of travel time to allow for delays.

We know that interviews can be stressful, but every effort will be made to ensure your experience will be as interesting and enjoyable as possible. The interview is designed to give you the very best opportunity to show your potential and readiness to study at NIDA.

Theatrical Prop Project Information

Project requirements

Produce a chess set belonging to Stan Winston (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Winston)

  • This shall have squares with sides of 50mm.
  • It will comply with FIDE regulations for chess sets points 2 and 3 with the exception of the recommendation in 2.3 that the pieces be of the new Staunton style: http://www.fide.com/fide/handbook?id=16&view=category
  • Only one example of each type of piece need be presented (minimum four pieces), however an example of the colour differentiation between pieces should be among this sample.
  • Please provide us with documentation of the creative and realization process e.g. video, time lapse, photographs.
  • Consider the constraints that will affect the use of the prop – think about what it will need to do on stage and how resilient it should be.
  • We do not expect you to have all the skills to produce an artefact of professional quality; however, we are interested in discussing your production process and the way you have addressed the perceived constraints.

Bring your entire project along to the interview – do not send it in advance.

Advanced standing

The collaborative nature of NIDA's conservatoire training means that NIDA does not encourage advanced standing/academic credit/recognition of prior learning, particularly for discipline based subjects. However a student can apply for academic credit or recognition of prior learning at the time of enrolment. Details are available on the student policies page.

See definitions for common terminology (PDF, 33KB).

Student profile

The table below gives an indication of the educational backgrounds of the 2018 commencing undergraduate BFA peer cohort in all disciplines at NIDA.

It should be noted that as selection and admission to courses at NIDA is based on merit the statistics below may not be indicative of the educational backgrounds of commencing cohorts on a year to year basis.

Applicant BackgroundNumber of studentsPercentage of all students
(A) Past higher education study7 11.5%
(B) Past Vocational Education and Training study1829.5%
(C) Recent secondary education
Admitted on basis of other criteria and ATAR was not a factor
20 32.8%
(D) Work and life experience15 24.6%
International students1 1.6%
All students61 100%

L/N - Low numbers: the number of students is less than 5.
N/P - Not published: the number is hidden to prevent calculation of numbers in cells with less than 5 students.

What does it take to put on a show?

Take a peek behind the curtain to see how our students collaborate each year on our June and October Student Production seasons.

Student work

See some of our students' work from productions, events, rehearsals, classwork and student projects.

Careers

As a graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Properties and Objects) you will have the necessary skills and knowledge required to succeed across the multidisciplinary field of properties production.

Potential careers

  • Properties maker
  • Scenic artist
  • Set decorator
  • Animator
  • Puppet-maker
  • Model-maker
  • Special effect artist
  • Draftsperson
  • 3D modellers
  • Workshop and project managers

See NIDA's list of Alumni.

Further Info

For more info, check the course guide (PDF, 2.5MB)

If you have any further questions about the application process, please contact:

Email: applications@nida.edu.au

Phone: +61 (02) 9697 7614
+61 (02) 9697 7611
+61 (02) 9697 7654

Mail:

Applications
NIDA
215 Anzac Parade
Kensington NSW 2033

Further information:

NIDA Undergraduate and Graduate policies and procedures
Commonwealth Register
National Register of Higher Education Providers

Read more about NIDA's Joint Heads of Properties and Objects Todd Arthur and Marcelo Zavala-Baeza


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